Last edited by Arashiran
Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of wing veins of insects found in the catalog.

wing veins of insects

C. W. Woodworth

wing veins of insects

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  • 3 Currently reading

Published by W. W. Shannon, supt. state printing in Sacramento .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Insects -- Anatomy,
  • Wings

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby C. W. Woodworth.
    SeriesUniversity of California Publications. Technical bulletins. College of Agriculture. Agricultural Experiment Station. Entomology., vol. I, no. 1 ... September, 1906
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL461 .C17 vol. 1, no. 1
    The Physical Object
    Pagination152 p.
    Number of Pages152
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6986128M
    LC Control Number07022728
    OCLC/WorldCa819082


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wing veins of insects by C. W. Woodworth Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Woodworth, C. (Charles William), Wing veins of insects. Sacramento: W.W. Shannon, supt.

State printing,   The Wing Veins Of Insects [Woodworth, Charles William] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Woodworth, Charles William: : BooksAuthor: Charles William Woodworth.

Insect Wings Insect wings have rigid veins which support the wing in flight. The wing veins may look different in different insect groups, scientists tracked that all different insect wings are evolved from the same ancestor, i.e.

wings had evolved only once in the insects history. Dragonfly Wing showing the series of cross-veins. Illustration of the cross veins on a Dragonfly wing. In most insect orders these cross veins are reduced or absent.

Primitively the pairs of wings beat independently of one another. This is rather inefficient, the effectiveness of the wing beat may be increased by the wings acting together.

The wings of insects; an exposition of the uniform terminology of the wing-veins of insects and adiscussion of the more general characteristics of the wings of the several orders of insects, By.

Comstock, John Henry, Type. Book Material. Cited by: 1. The team found that in all simulated environmental conditions, despite diverse visible colors and patterns, the areas of butterfly wings that contain live cells (wing veins and scent pads) are.

The wings of insects; an exposition of the uniform terminology of the wing-veins of insects and a discussion of the more general characteristics of the wings of the several orders of insects [John Henry Comstock] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text.

Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book. Properties of the Veins. A network of longitudinal veins and cross-sectional veins divides the wing-surface into characteristic numerous smaller membrane cells (see Figure 1 and).In locusts, the longitudinal veins are hollow cuticular tubes with a diameter of approx.

to µm at the base, thinning towards the edge of the of the longitudinal veins contain trachea, nerves and Cited by: Insects are the only invertebrates to have evolved wings Wings are usually membranous with veins, wing folding is more advanced Not all insects have wings though Some have no wings at all, others only have wing pads and they don’t develop All insects have 3 pairs of jointed legs Thorax is a cylinder with 9 pieces Pro-Thorax Meso-Thorax Meta File Size: 2MB.

Most insect wings are very thin and light. They hold their shape thanks to veins full of blood that run through them. Common wasp. Bees and wasps have two pairs of see-through wings, which often make a buzzing noise as the insects fly. This common wasp flies around looking for food.

It will eat almost anything, from fruit and nectar to dead. Wings, veins. Fore wing (upper) and hind wing (lower) of honey bee worker. Venation terminology based on Michener (). (scale bar = 1 mm) 1m-cu - first medio-cubital cross-vein (first recurrent) 2m-cu - second medio-cubital cross-vein (second recurrent).

Wing Venation: The archedictyon is the name given to a hypothetical scheme of wing venation proposed for the very first winged insect. It is based on a combination of speculation and fossil data.

Since all winged insects are believed to have evolved from a common ancestor, the archediction represents the "template" that has been modified (and streamlined) by natural selection for million.

The wings of insects: an exposition of the uniform terminology of the wing-veins of insects and a discussion of the more general characteristics of the wings of the several orders of insects by Comstock, John Henry, Get this from a library.

The wings of insects: an exposition of the uniform terminology of the wing-veins of insects and a discussion of the more general characteristics of the wings of the several orders of insects. [John Henry Comstock]. Researchers at the University of Manitoba studied color patterns in various species of butterflies, including painted ladies (Vanessa cardui), and the underlying genes that drive those patterns, revealing a previously undetected compartment boundary that may exist in the wings of all holometabolous insects.(Photo credit: Jeffrey Marcus, Ph.D., and Roohollah Abbasi, Ph.D.).

The main veins in an insect’s wing run longitudinally (ie from near the body towards the wing tips) but frequently fork off into branches and this is where confusion can (and does!) occur.

These main veins are connected by short cross-veins. Generally it is the main veins that you’ll be looking at but the cross-veins can be important. SUMMARY. During flight, many insect wings undergo dramatic deformations that are controlled largely by the architecture of the wing.

The pattern of supporting veins in wings varies widely among insect orders and families, but the functional significance of phylogenetic trends in wing venation remains unknown, and measurements of the mechanical properties of wings are by:   The articular sclerites, or pteralia, of the wing base of the wing-flexing insects and their relations to the body and the wing veins, shown diagrammatically, are as follows: Humeral plates First Axillary Second Axillary Third Axillary Fourth Axillary Median plates (m, m') The humeral plate is usually a small sclerite on the anterior margin of.

Therefore you want as few veins as possible to keep the weight of the wing low," said Dirks. However, as the videos demonstrate, with fewer veins in. The earliest insects had four wings, independently functioning forewings and hindwings. The well-known insects, damselflies and dragonflies, have kept this design.

Since then, insect wing designs vary where either the forewing or hindwing are specialized for force production, while many other insects are functionally 2 winged through.

Venation is the name given to the arrangement (number and position) of veins within an insect's wing. Entomologists study the venation of wings and this is often used as a way of differentiating between otherwise similar species.

In early insects the veins running down the wing (longitudinal veins) were connected by a series of cross veins. Traits and evolution of wing venation pattern in Paraneopteran insects Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Morphology (5) May with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'.

The Comstock–Needham system is a naming system for insect wing veins, devised by John Comstock and George Needham in It was an important step in showing the homology of all insect wings.

This system was based on Needham's pretracheation theory. This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Diagram of insect wing venation. Redrawn with modifications from Chapman (fig.

The veins are named according to system of Comstock and Needham modified by Wootton. On the right side of the diagram there is a section across the wing. The section was made along the line marked with arrows. In The Wings of Insects.

An Exposition of hte Uniform Terminology of the Wing Veins of Insects and a Discussion of the More General Characteristics of the Wing of the Several Orders of Insects, Work cited.

Dahl, C. & Krzemińska, E. () Family Trichoceridae: Wing veins (Comstock-Needham System) Wing cells (Constock-Needham System) English: Hymenoptera front wing venulation in according to interpretation by Herbert H. Ross (). Insects are a group of organisms that possess maximum diversity.

It is estimated that about 6 - 10 million species of insects exist on the Earth, some of which are not even identified as yet. There are many types of flying insects, each characterized by specific features.

Some of the commonly observed ones are beetles, grasshoppers, bugs, stick insects, and butterflies. R-M cross-veins - run between the radius and media; M-Cu cross-veins - run between the media and cubitus; All the veins of the wing are subject to secondary forking and to union by cross-veins.

In some orders of insects, the cross-veins are so numerous, the whole venational pattern becomes a close network of branching veins and cross-veins. The most recent understanding of the evolution of insects is based on studies of the following branches of science: molecular biology, insect morphology, paleontology, insect taxonomy, evolution, embryology, bioinformatics and scientific computing.

It is estimated that the class of insects originated on Earth about million years ago, in the Ordovician, at about the same time terrestrial Dicondylia: Apterygota, -ThysanuraMonura. The wing venation of each order is reviewed according to tracheation, and colored schemata of the actual wing venation are provided as well as detailed illustrations of the tracheation in select families.

According to the results of our study of vein tracheation, new homology statements and a revised nomenclature for veins and cells are : Laura C. Breitkreuz, Shaun L. Winterton, Michael S. Engel. STRENGTHEN by a number of longitudinal veins which often have cross connections that form closed ''cells'' in the membrane- Odonata Neuroptera The patterns resulting from the fusion and cross connection of the wing veins are often diagnostic for different evolutionary lineages and can be used for identification to the FAMILY or even GENUS level.

The Wings of Insects: An Exposition of the Uniform Terminology of the Wing-Veins of Insects and a Discussion of the More General Characteristics of the Wings of the Several Orders of Insects Average rating: 0 out of 5 stars, based on 0 reviews Write a reviewBrand: John Henry Comstock.

The team found that in all simulated environmental conditions, despite diverse visible colors and patterns, the areas of butterfly wings that contain live cells (wing veins and scent pads) are always cooler than the “lifeless” regions of the wing due to enhanced radiative cooling.

Wing veins provide support for the thin, delicate membranous cuticle that make up the rest of the wing, as shown here by these two wings from a fly.

Many veins also house tracheae and provide a passage for haemolymph (blood). Numerous sense organs are found on the wings, especially wind sensitive hairs, and the cells in these organs must. The patterns of veins within an insect are unique and can be used to identify species. Looking at vein patterns can also help scientists to guess what the insects ancestor’s wings may have looked like.

Below are the various regions of an insects wing. Until recently, scientists were puzzled by the evolution of flight in insects. The forms of the legs vary, depending on their uses, but all insect legs are made up of five parts. In winged insects, the wings, usually four in number, grow from the thorax between the mesothorax and the metathorax.

The upper and lower membranes of the wings cover a network of sclerotized tubes, called veins, that stiffen the wing. Wing Secrets That Help Insects Rule the World. Models like the Comstock-Needham System name typical insect veins, and suggest what the ancestral wing veins may have looked like.

Wings are supported by reinforcing structures called veins. Venation (the arrangement of veins in wings) is different among many groups of insects, even species, and serves as a useful means for insect identification (Figure 4–4). Wing surfaces may be bare or covered with fine hairs or scales.

All the veins of the wing are subject to secondary forking and to union by cross-veins. In some orders of insects the cross-veins are so numerous that the whole venational pattern becomes a close network of branching veins and cross-veins.

Ordinarily, however, there is a definite number of cross-veins having specific locations. insects contribute to blood flow, including flow through wing veins.

The role of blood in insects is the transport of nutrients, wastes, and hormones. It is NOT the primary means of moving oxygen and carbon dioxide. (There is no hemoglobin in insects except in immature Chironomus spp.

and a few others.) Reproductive system:File Size: KB.This family is easily recognised by the complex wing venation. Tangle-vein Fly has five to seven nearly parallel branches of veins reaching the anterior margin of the wing. The flies are large to medium size with hairy body.

The larvae are parasitic on insects includes .Wing vein development in Drosophila. (a) Schematic diagram of wing vein development of the third-instar wing imaginal disc.

Positions of longitudinal veins (L2-L5, red) are identified as pro-veins.